An Ultimate Guide To Asian Handicap Betting: Everything You Need To Know

If you are tired of traditional 1×2 markets or straight win bets, it’s time to consider Asian lines. Punters worldwide already use Asian handicapping as their go-to betting method, so why not join them?

But before you place your first pounds on Asian lines at UK betting sites, it’s crucial to get a deep understanding of Asian handicap betting.

Therefore, let’s not waste any more time and jump straight into Asian handicaps. We’ll cover the theoretical basics and provide real-life examples of this betting market.

6 Quick Facts About Asian Handicap Betting

  • Asian lines came to prominence in the 1990s, first in Indonesia and then the rest of Asia.
  • The term Asian handicap first appeared in 1998.
  • Asian handicap eliminates the draw from the equation.
  • Asian handicap allocates an advantage/disadvantage to the teams, levelling the playing field.
  • In case of a push (draw), Asian handicap voids the bet on the particular selection.
  • Asian handicaps can come as full, half, and quarter goal offers.

The History of Asian Handicap Betting

Unlike most other betting markets, Asian lines are only a couple of decades old. In the UK betting realm, Asian handicaps are among the youngest betting options.

Nonetheless, these wagers have taken the world by storm, primarily in the early years of the 21st century. As the name implies, Asian handicaps first appeared in Asia. Precisely, the Asian handicap betting method originates from Indonesia.

In 1998, journalist Joe Saumarez Smith translated the term “hang cheng betting”, and it has remained in use to this day. Of course, you may wish to know what it all means, so let’s revisit the basics and see how Asian handicaps work.

What Does Asian Handicap Mean?

Asian handicaps are synonymous with point spread betting, and the premise of this concept is to provide punters with extra betting opportunities. The term ‘handicap’ in betting refers to a burden or an obstacle a team must overcome to beat the opponent.

Bookmakers place handicaps on favoured teams to balance the odds between mismatched contestants. For instance, a cup tie between Manchester United and Crawley Town has a clear favourite and an underdog. In that case, bookies allocate a virtual disadvantage to Manchester United, or they give a perceived advantage to Crawley Town before kickoff.

Of course, it will be best to explain Asian handicap betting through practical examples you’ll find below. For now, it’s essential to understand that the Asian line reduces the number of potential outcomes by eliminating the tie option from the equation.

In the next section, we will explain the primary differences between the traditional and Asian handicap. So, let’s check them out.

Asian Handicap vs Traditional Handicap Betting

For decades, UK bookmakers have offered handicap betting. In most cases, punters opted for these markets when betting on horses. The primary goal was to boost the odds and maximise returns when a runner is no match for its competitors.

And then, Asian lines stepped onto the scene. But what Asian handicap is, and how does it differ from the traditional one?

Unlike traditional handicap betting markets, Asian lines offer only two outcomes. To be precise, you will receive your stake back if the bet ends in a push. For instance, traditional handicap betting would not void the bet if a football match ends in a draw and you backed a winner. On the other hand, with a 0:0 or 1:1 result, you will neither win nor lose.

Asian handicap in football betting is common at UK betting sites, but punters should know that these markets come with a low margin. Even so, Asian lines have a lot of benefits, making them an attractive option for many punters.

To sum up, you’ll recognise these markets by the AH mark next to the fixture. Also, a numerical value will express the degree of the handicap that can be either positive or negative. Namely, you’ll see the best UK betting sites write AH -1 or AH +1.25 next to the pair.

Asian Handicap Betting Examples

Many punters find similarities between Asian handicaps and Draw No Bet options. And they are right since these markets try to offer a level betting environment. The Draw No Bet, also known as a two-way moneyline in baseball or hockey, will see your stake returned in case of a draw.

Yet, there are differences between these two wagering options. The reason hides in the fact that Asian handicap betting comes in several variations. Precisely, bookmakers offer the full goal, half goal, and quarter goal Asian handicap.

As the name says, the full goal type features whole numbers (+1, -1, +2, – 3, and so on). With this wagering option, the draw is possible, and you’ll receive your stake back. The numbers show the advantage allocated to the particular team. So, for Asian handicaps in football betting, -1 means that the team starts with a one-goal deficit.

The half goal Asian handicap removes the draw from the possibilities because your starting position with this type is 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, and so on. Therefore, any goals scored will not lead to an even number necessary for a draw. For instance, if Liverpool start the game with -0.5 as an imaginary deficit, it will not end in a tie if they let in one goal (0.5 vs 1). The same happens if they score one or more, making half goal handicaps an exciting option for any modern punter.

When placing Asian handicap bets, you’ll also come across the third type of Asian handicaps. The so-called two-way handicaps feature a quarter number as the perceived advantage/disadvantage. So, these betting markets might come as 1.25, 1.75, or 2.25. What makes these options attractive is the way they pay out. Interestingly, quarter goal Asian handicaps split the payouts in two, half to the 1 part and half to the 0.25 part.

Pros and Cons of Placing Asian Handicap Bets

As you could’ve noticed by now, Asian handicaps are both exciting and easy to use. Millions of punters use them to increase their profits when betting on the best UK online bookies.

To recap, we should mention that Asian handicaps’ most significant benefit would be the reduced risk. These markets decrease the number of possibilities, making it more challenging to miss the target. As a rule of thumb, Asian handicap betting offers only two potential outcomes, getting as close to even money payouts as possible.

On the other hand, Asian lines are far from a perfect betting market. Due to low returns, these bets add little value to a bet slip. Asian handicaps typically come with low odds, and many punters shy away from these markets when hunting for massive winnings.

Table of Contents

The History of Asian Handicap Betting

What Does Asian Handicap Mean?

Asian Handicap vs Traditional Handicap Betting

Asian Handicap Betting Examples

Pros and Cons of Placing Asian Handicap Bets

Table of Contents

The History of Asian Handicap Betting

What Does Asian Handicap Mean?

Asian Handicap vs Traditional Handicap Betting

Asian Handicap Betting Examples

Pros and Cons of Placing Asian Handicap Bets

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